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You Can Save Over $350 a Year on Streaming Services If You Don’t Mind Commercials

Quite a lot, according to new data from Parks Associates.

The average streaming household, which subscribes to 5.6 platforms, according to the research firm, could save $366 a year on average by switching to ad-based tiers.

“The move to ad-based services provides more options for consumers, especially as they are seeking a balance between costs and the desire for multiple content options,” Jennifer Kent, Parks Associates vice president of research, said in a statement. “Not everyone’s favorite streaming service offers a cheaper ad-based service tier yet, and many subscribers will choose a mix of ad-based and premium options, depending on household preferences.”

Earlier this month, during the firm’s presentation of its State of the Market: Streaming Video Services report, Parks Associates said in the past month, 31% of U.S. households reported watching an ad-supported video on demand or a free ad-supported streaming service – a 13% increase from 2018. In addition, 41 million U.S. households are expected to watch ad-based over-the-top (OTT) video services like Tubi, Freevee, and Pluto TV. Last December, the firm said streaming subscriptions has declined 25% from $90 in 2021 to $73 in 2023, as viewers migrated to free, ad-supported services to save money.

Kent’s prediction that subscribers will choose a mix of ad-based and premium options further supports the firm’s previous notion that platform consolidation could be a potential solution for companies, viewers, and advertisers.

From the article, "You Can Save Over $350 a Year on Streaming Services If You Don’t Mind Commercials" by Shelby Brown

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