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mHealth Still Missing the Comfort Zone for Chronic Care Patients

A report from digital health analyst Parks Associates indicates 27 percent of those surveyed with a chronic condition want a mobile health device that tracks their condition – yet significant numbers also report that the devices they now have are too complicated to use or don’t work properly.

"Nearly one-half of type I diabetics and one-third of type II diabetics are interested in health monitoring devices such as glucometers, but a steep learning curve and difficult or counterintuitive directions could inhibit their usage of these devices and also prevent them from buying other connected health devices," Harry Wang, the group’s senior director of research, said in a press release accompanying the report. "Device and application manufacturers would benefit from improving the ease-of-use of these devices."

The study points to a continuation of missed opportunities in mHealth for both patients and their caregivers. 

From the article "mHealth Still Missing the Comfort Zone for Chronic Care Patients" by Eric Wicklund.

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